wheat field

Timely rains are needed to ensure wheat will soon be looking like the field in this file photo, taken near the Montana border.

Warm, dry weather the past week helped areas of North Dakota catch up on spring wheat planting, but its progress remains behind Montana and its other neighbors, and is also behind both last year and five-year averages.

North Dakota’s spring wheat crop is just 85 percent planted, while neighboring states like Montana are more like 97 percent.

North Dakota’s five-year average for this time of year is 95 percent, and last year’s crop was 90 percent planted by this time.

Montana spring wheat, at 97 percent in the ground, is also ahead of 90 percent and its five-year 95 percent average.

Durum, meanwhile, is better in North Dakota at 87 percent in the ground, ahead of last year’s 83 percent, while it’s at just 79 percent in neighboring Montana, which is well behind last year’s 87 percent and the five-year 93 percent average.

Most spring wheat’s holdup in North Dakota has been in areas of central and east central North Dakota. These problems apply to all crops, however, not just wheat, and suggest that the region will see more prevented planting acreage this year.

The west, meanwhile, while ahead on planting progress, is abnormally dry, and some areas are experiencing moderate drought. Timely precipitation is going to be needed soon for wheat that has emerged.

Durum emergence is at 52 percent in North Dakota, ahead of last year’s 47 percent and behind the five-year 62 percent average. In Montana, durum is 29 percent emerged — well behind 44 percent last year and the five-year 55 percent average.

Nationally, about two-thirds of the spring wheat crop is out of the ground, compared to a more usual 80 percent average at this time.

In North Dakota, spring wheat is 78 percent emerged with 80 percent rated in good to excellent condition. Montana, meanwhile, is seeing 83 percent emergence, well ahead of last year’s 54 percent, and the five-year 74 percent average.

Winter wheat is rated 70 percent good to excellent. Winter wheat jointed is 69 percent in North Dakota, ahead of 57 last year, but near the 70 percent average. Headed is 2 percent, near 1 last year and 5 on average.

How other crops are faring

• North Dakota soybeans are 51 percent planted, behind 63 last year and well behind 80 for the five-year average. Emergence is at 12 percent, which is near 10 last year, but well behind the five-year 37 percent average.

• Montana corn is 86 percent planted, ahead of last year’s 70 percent, and in sync with the five-year 86 percent average. Emergence is at 41 percent, ahead of last year, but behind the five-year 54 percent average.

• In North Dakota, meanwhile, corn is 75 percent in the ground, near 76 last year, but still behind the five-year 90 percent average. Emergence is 26 percent, near 22 last year, but well behind the 57 percent average.

• For canola, Montana is 68 percent planted, ahead of 65 percent last year but behind the five-year 78 percent average. North Dakota, meanwhile, is 75 percent planted, behind 87 last year. Emerged is 29 percent, behind 39 last year and well behind the five-year 61 percent average.

• Montana sugarbeets are 71 percent emerged, which is ahead of last year’s 66 percent, and near the five-year 72 percent average. The crop is rated 74 percent good to excellent, and 26 percent fair.

• In North Dakota, Sugarbeets are 99 percent planted, just ahead of last year’s 98 percent, but just behind the 100 percent average.

• North Dakota Oats are rated 67 percent good to excellent and only 1 percent are poor or very poor. The rest, 32 percent, are rated fair. Emergence is at 48 percent, which is just ahead of last year, but well behind the five-year 71 percent average. Jointed is 5 percent, near 3 last year, but behind 15 average.

• Montana oats are 89 percent planted, ahead of both last year’s 81 percent and the five-year 86 percent average. Emergence is 65 percent, ahead of last year’s 36 percent and the five-year 62 percent average.

• Barley, meanwhile, is 83 percent planted in North Dakota, which is behind 90 percent last year and the 96 percent average. Emerged is 42 percent, behind 61 percent last year, and well behind the 79 percent average. Jointed is 3 percent, equal to last year, and behind the 15 percent average.

• In Montana, barley is 96 percent planted, which is ahead of last year’s 90 percent and the five-year 95 percent average. Emerged is 30 percent, also ahead of last year’s 63 percent, but behind the five-year 78 percent average.

• Dry edible peas in North Dakota are 88 percent planted, near 87 last year, but behind the 94 percent average. Emerged is 53 percent, near 51 last year, but behind the 71 average.

• In Montana, dry edible peas are 92 percent planted, which is just behind last year’s 93 percent. A five-year average is not available due to reporting changes.

• Montana safflower, meanwhile, is 57 percent planted, well ahead of last year’s 36 percent and ahead of the five-year 51 percent average. Emergence is 31 percent, which is well ahead of both last year’s 10 percent and the five-year 26 percent average.

• North Dakota sunflowers are 40 percent planted, near 37 last year, but behind the 57 percent average. Emerged is just 3 percent, near 5 last year, but behind the 13 percent average.

• North Dakota Flaxseed is 79 percent in the ground, which is near 78 last year and the 83 percent average. Emerged, meanwhile, is 24 percent, which is behind 36 percent last year and the five-year 42 percent average.

• Montana flaxseed is similar, at 79 percent planted — well ahead of last year’s 57 percent, but well behind the five-year 82 percent average. Emerged is 39 percent, ahead of 10 percent last year and just behind the five-year 41 percent average.

• Montana lentils are 90 percent planted, in line with last year’s 89 percent average. A five-year average is not available.

• Montana mustard seed is 91 percent planted, in line with 89 percent last year. No five-year average is available. Emerged is 35 percent, ahead of 31 percent last year, but well behind the five-year 53 percent average.

• North Dakota potatoes, meanwhile, are 80 percent in the ground, behind 94 last year and the 90 percent average. Emerged is 12 percent. Near 9 last year, but behind the 24 percent average.

• North Dakota has planted 46 percent of its dry edible beans, behind 65 percent last year and well behind the five-year 72 percent average. Emerged is 4 percent, near 7 last year, but behind the five-year 19 percent average.

• Montana’s dry edible beans, meanwhile, are 90 percent planted, ahead of last year’s 76 percent, and the five-year 85 percent average. Emergence is 35 percent, ahead of 26 percent last year and the 48 percent average.

• Pasture and range in North Dakota are rated 72 percent good to excellent. Only 6 percent are rated as poor or very poor. Twenty-two percent are rated fair.

• In Montana, 66 percent of pasture and range are rated good to excellent, while 4 percent are poor to very poor. The remainder, 30 percent, is rated fair.

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